Post Written by Artichoke Gallery

“For in the dew of little things, does the heart find its morning and is refreshed.”
Kahlil Gibran

As I write we are just leaving February, with the warmest ever winter days. Not for us the hesitant emerging of buds poking their noses into cold and frosty mornings. Spring came early, yet still we wait for the abundance of summer, rose gardens and herbaceous borders riotous and billowing with colour. Delicate blooms plucked for display in irresistible vases, statuesque pots overflowing with flowers, birdsong erupting through an open window and the gentle buzz of insects: busy, busy, busy.

Our gaze wanders to the horizon, catching movement as birds swirl and swoop in the warm evenings, before we turn to tend the vegetables. Juicy mellow fruits soon to ripen and grace the table in delightful decorated bowls, bringing the inside out for quiet evening drinks. The earthly delights of a voluptuous garden captured in paint, glaze and sculpture, treasured memories recorded by skillful artists.

Dressing up for summer parties, sun blushed complexions a perfect foil for intricate precious jewellery, a soft pastel cotton scarf to ward off the chill as the sun sets. Looking for a hostess gift? Who doesn’t love a jug, a vase, a “thank you” becomes a treasured possession.

“Coming Up Roses” is an exuberant, uplifting collection of paintings, sculpture, ceramics and jewellery in the garden and across the fields. You can go along to Artichoke for opening drinks on Friday 5th April, 6-8pm.

Artichoke Gallery, Church Street, Ticehurst TN5 7AE
Open Tuesday to Saturday 9.30am to 4.30pm.
www.artichokegallery.co.uk
Telephone 01580 200905.
Email: artichokegallery@gmail.com

The full lineup of artists can be seen at www.artichokegallery.co.uk/coming-up-roses

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